A Listing of World Anthropology Journals

April 6, 2011

Hi, everyone,

 

The WCAA webpage now provides the websites of some 400 anthropological journals from around the world, some of which offer limited access to readers, and others full access. This, we think, is the only site in the world that provides, with a few mouseclicks, a glimpse of all the world’s anthropology. We think we have on this website every anthropological publication in the world that has a presence on the internet; if we have missed any, please let me know, at cmgordon@cuhk.edu.hk.

 

Surveying the state of anthropology in the world today, what we see is an unwitting domination by the Anglo-American core of anthropology; anthropologists throughout much of the world pay attention to the Anglo-American core, but it pays little attention to anthropologies beyond its bounds, and those other anthropologies pay little attention to one another. A website like this can, we hope, eventually enable anthropologists the world over to read anthropologies the world over. This is its aim: to take a step, however small, towards the creation of a global anthropology. Only if anthropology becomes truly global can it ever hope to fully overcome its colonial legacy of the rich studying the poor, the North studying the South. Maybe this site can help do that in a small way.

 

This site puts all the world’s anthropologies on a common platform, although of course language barriers remain. From this array of different journals, if we can gather an array of anthropological readers, perhaps discussions can start. Typically, Chinese anthropologists never discuss with sub-Saharan African anthropologists and Eastern European anthropologists and Indonesian anthropologists and Brazilian anthropologists and American anthropologists about the nature of culture and globalization, or anthropological ethics, or cultural and ethnic identity, or the nature of heritage, and so on, because there has been no place for such a debate. Maybe this site and this blog can serve as such a place. That’s why we begin this blog.

 

I will be adding commentary every week: my views are not those of WCAA, but simply my own, as an individual anthropologist. The more we can hear from all of you, the better: I don’t own this! Please send me your own commentary, at the address I’ve provided above, of no more than 500 words, on any topic relating to global anthropology, and I will put it on. Let’s get a conversation started!

 

Best regards,

Gordon Mathews,
The Chinese University of Hong Kong

Entry filed under: Admin Posts. Tags: .

Some treasures from the WCAA Publications list

6 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Aluminum composite materials  |  April 28, 2011 at 3:42 am

    Interesting post.

    Reply
  • 2. kunde  |  April 29, 2011 at 12:17 am

    Lots of excellent reading here, many thanks! I was searching on yahoo when I observed your submit, I’m going to add your feed to Google Reader, I look forward to more from you.

    Reply
  • 3. Nike Air Max  |  May 9, 2011 at 6:30 am

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  • 4. Thomas Reuter  |  September 22, 2011 at 6:58 am

    Thank you, Gorden, for this very important and timely analysis of how rising journal costs and proliferating journal quality ranking schemes act to increase global inequality in the production and dissemination of knowledge, in anthropology and beyond. I am wondering whether anyone has had any experience as a user or editor of open access journals? We need to share information on how open access models can be made effective and viable.
    WCAA delegates were involved in a panel on anthropological knowledge and inequality at the AAA in New Orleans in 2010, chaired by Michelle Daveluy and Gustavo Lins Ribeiro, and we shall continue to explore this topic in future conferences, such as the ASA conference in New Delhi next year. But many people are also excluded from regular conference attendance, and it would be great to hear about your alternative views and your experiences on this blog.
    Thanks!

    Reply
  • 5. Horace Hueckman  |  November 25, 2011 at 7:59 pm

    Very interesting points you have remarked, appreciate it for putting up. “Death is Nature’s expert advice to get plenty of Life.” by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe.

    Reply
  • 6. social  |  May 4, 2012 at 12:14 am

    I Will have to visit again when my course load lets up – however I am getting your Rss feed so i can go through your internet site offline. Thanks.

    Reply

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